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Fluoroscopy

What is Fluoroscopy?

Fluoroscopy is a radiological technique where a low dose of x-rays are combined with an image intensifier to create an image on a monitor which allows real time evaluation of several parts of the body. The most common exams are:

 

With the assistance of a radiology technologist, the radiologist will perform the examination, take several films for review and documentation, and send a report to your physician.

Barium Swallow

What is a Barium Swallow?
The Barium Swallow is an examination to evaluate the swallowing function and the upper esophagus. Patients having this study often have complaints of difficulty swallowing, a sensation of a lump in the throat, or coughing while eating or drinking that might indicate aspiration.

You are placed on the fluoroscopy table and examined in several positions, usually upright and lying on the stomach. In order to visualize the anatomy, you will make several swallows of an oral contrast material called barium. The radiologist will monitor the flow of the contrast and make a videotape or a series of images for analysis and to create a permanent record. The radiologist will interpret the images and send a report to your physician.

Is the examination safe?
During the fluoroscopy you will be exposed to a very low dose of x-rays radiation. The radiologist and technologist will make every effort to limit the dose of radiation administered to you. The risk from this low dose of radiation is very slight and greatly outweighed by the benefits of the information gained by performing the examination. Pregnant women, women of childbearing age, and children are further protected by lead shielding during the examination.

What should I wear?
You are usually asked to remove clothing from the waist up and given a hospital type gown for the examination. You should remove all metal jewelry that may interfere with the study. You should wear clothing that is easily removed. Necklaces, other jewelry, and valuables can be left at home.

What preparation is needed?
The fluoroscopy is usually performed in the morning. Please have nothing to eat or drink after midnight prior to the examination. Medications can be taken with a small amount water.

How long will the examination take?
The examination usually takes about 20 minutes. Once the images are obtained, you may leave the imaging center.

What can be expected after the examination?
Following the examination, you should resume a normal diet with plenty of liquids. Some patients find that the barium can be constipating. You will be offered a stool softener but a normal diet and normal liquid intake is usually sufficient.

When will my physician get the results?
A Via Radiology radiologist will study the images and provide a written report which includes a description of the findings, any diagnosis that can be made from the exam, as well as a recommendation for further studies if needed. Our reports are usually available within 24 hours of completion of the examination, and are generally received by your physician within two working days. A report may be delayed if we are awaiting studies from an outside facility for comparison purposes. If the results are urgent or if you are seeing your doctor on the same day as your exam, your doctor may request that a preliminary report be phoned or faxed.

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Upper GI

What is an Upper GI?
An upper gastrointestinal series (Upper GI) is an x-ray examination of the esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the small intestine. The procedure is performed to investigate digestive function or possible abnormalities such as ulcers, inflammation or tumors. Patients who undergo this procedure may have difficulty swallowing, complain of chest or upper abdominal pain, have gastroesophogeal reflux, or unexplained vomiting, indigestion, blood in the stool, or anemia.

You will be placed on the x-ray table and asked to drink a liquid contrast material called barium which will coat the intestinal tract and allow visualization of the esophagus, stomach, and first part of the small intestine. The radiologist will monitor the flow of the contrast into the gastrointestinal tract on a fluoroscope. X-rays will be made for analysis and creation of a permanent record.

Is the examination safe?
During the study you will be exposed to a very low dose of x-ray radiation. The radiologist and the technologist will make every effort to limit the dose of radiation you receive. The risk from this amount of radiation is very low and is far exceeded by the benefits of the information learned by the study. Pregnant women should not have this study unless absolutely necessary. Women of childbearing age and children will be further protected with lead shielding during the fluoroscopy. Pregnant women should not have this study unless absolutely necessary.

What should I wear?                                                                                                                           Via Radiology will supply you with scrubs to wear for your procedure.


What preparation is needed?

The Upper GI is performed with your stomach empty since food and liquids may interfere with visualizing the gastrointestinal tract. The examination is usually performed in the morning. Please have nothing to eat or drink after midnight. Medications may be taken in the morning with a small amount of water.

How long will it take?
The examination usually takes about 20 minutes. Once the films are developed, you will be able to leave the department.

What can be expected after the examination?

Following the examination, you should resume a normal diet with plenty of liquids. Some patients find that the barium can be constipating. You will be offered a stool softener, but a normal diet and normal liquid intake is usually sufficient.

When will my physician get the results?
A Via Radiology radiologist will study the images and provide a written report which includes a description of the findings, any diagnosis that can be made from the exam, as well as a recommendation for further studies if needed. Our reports are usually available within 24 hours of completion of the examination, and are generally received by your physician within two working days. A report may be delayed if we are awaiting studies from an outside facility for comparison purposes. If the results are urgent or if you are seeing your doctor on the same day as your exam, your doctor may request that a preliminary report be phoned or faxed.

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Small Bowel Follow Through

What is a Small Bowel Follow Through?
A Small Bowel Follow Through is an x-ray examination of the small intestine. The exam is usually performed to evaluate for inflammatory bowel disease, obstruction of the small intestine, or gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients who undergo this procedure may have abdominal pain, unexplained vomiting, blood in the stool, or anemia.

You will be placed on the x-ray table and asked to drink a liquid contrast material called barium which will coat the intestinal tract. The radiologist will monitor the flow of the contrast with x-rays every 15-30 minutes. Towards the end of the exam the radiologist or technologist may use fluoroscopy to further visualize the small intestine.

Is the examination safe?
During the study you will be exposed to a very low dose of radiation. The radiologist and technologist will make every effort to limit the dose of radiation you receive. The risk from this amount of radiation is very low and is far exceeded by the benefits of the information learned by the study. Pregnant women should not have this study unless absolutely necessary.

What should I wear?
You are usually asked to remove clothing from the waist up and given a hospital type gown for the examination. You should remove all jewelry, necklaces, and metal objects such as belt buckles that may interfere with the examination. Wear clothing that is easily removed and leave necklaces, jewelry, and other valuables at home.

What preparation is needed?
The exam is performed with your stomach empty since food and liquids may interfere with visualizing the gastrointestinal tract. The examination is usually performed in the morning. Please have nothing to eat or drink after midnight. Medications may be taken in the morning with a small amount of water.

How long will it take?
The examination length is variable, since the time of transit through the gastrointestinal tract is variable. Generally the exam takes approximately 2 hours, though exams lasting 3-4 hours are not uncommon. X-rays are generally obtained every 15-30 minutes, so there is a considerable amount of waiting time during the exam. You are encouraged to bring reading material to pass the time. Once the films are developed, you will be able to leave the department.

What can be expected after the exam?
Following the examination, you should resume a normal diet with plenty of liquids. Some patients find that the barium can be constipating. You will be offered a stool softener, but a normal diet and normal liquid intake is usually sufficient.

When will my physician get the results?
A Via Radiology radiologist will study the images and provide a written report which includes a description of the findings, any diagnosis that can be made from the exam, as well as a recommendation for further studies if needed. Our reports are usually available within 24 hours of completion of the examination, and are generally received by your physician within two working days. A report may be delayed if we are awaiting studies from an outside facility for comparison purposes. If the results are urgent or if you are seeing your doctor on the same day as your exam, your doctor may request that a preliminary report be phoned or faxed.

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Lower GI

What is a lower GI?
The lower GI procedure (Barium Enema) is performed to investigate possible abnormalities of the colon or large intestine. Patients who undergo this procedure often complain of constipation, diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, unexplained abdominal pain, or blood in the stool. The study can be used to diagnose inflammatory bowel disease or screen for colon cancer.

Prior to the procedure you will need to take laxatives to cleanse the colon of fecal material. In order to visualize the anatomy, the colon must be filled with contrast material (barium) and usually distended with air. A small tube is placed into the rectum by the technologist and the flow of barium monitored by the radiologist using a fluoroscope. Air is instilled to distend the colon for the most accurate films. During the procedure, detailed films of portions of the colon are obtained by the radiologist and additional films of the entire colon are then obtained in several positions by the technologist.

Is the examination safe?
During the study you will be exposed to a very low dose of radiation. The radiologist and technologist will make every effort to limit the dose of radiation you receive. The risk from this amount of radiation is very low and is far exceeded by the benefits of the information learned by the study. Pregnant women should not have this study unless absolutely necessary.

What should I wear?
You will be asked to remove all clothing and be given a hospital type gown for the examination. You should remove all jewelry and metal objects that may interfere with the fluoroscopy. Wear clothing that is easily removed and leave jewelry and other valuables at home.

What preparation is needed?
The lower GI is performed after cleansing of the colon to remove fecal material which will interfere with creating accurate images for interpretation. At the time of scheduling you will be given instructions for the preparation which includes a liquid diet and laxatives. You should not eat or drink after midnight the evening before the examination. Medications can be taken the morning of the study with a small amount of water.

How long will it take?
The examination usually takes about 30 minutes. Once the films are developed, you will be able to leave the department.

What can be expected after the examination?
Following the examination, you should resume a normal diet with plenty of liquids. Over the course of 2-3 days the barium will pass from the system. Some patients find that the barium can be constipating. A normal diet with normal liquid intake is usually sufficient.

When will my physician get the results?
A Via Radiology radiologist will study the images and provide a written report which includes a description of the findings, any diagnosis that can be made from the exam, as well as a recommendation for further studies if needed. Our reports are usually available within 24 hours of completion of the examination, and are generally received by your physician within two working days. A report may be delayed if we are awaiting studies from an outside facility for comparison purposes. If the results are urgent or if you are seeing your doctor on the same day as your exam, your doctor may request that a preliminary report be phoned or faxed.

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